Top 25 Internet Roundup: The Do’s and Don’ts of Facebook Advertising, Promoted Tweets to App Timeline, The 8 Principles of Product Naming, The Anatomy of an Effective Web Design, and Writing Great Subject Lines

Facebook Marketing

The Do’s and Don’ts of Advertising on Facebook
Yes, you should consider advertising. Yes, you can start with Facebook ads. Yes, you can learn how to Continue reading Top 25 Internet Roundup: The Do’s and Don’ts of Facebook Advertising, Promoted Tweets to App Timeline, The 8 Principles of Product Naming, The Anatomy of an Effective Web Design, and Writing Great Subject Lines

Top 25 Internet Roundup: Tips to Increase Facebook Fans, Avoid Hashtag Disasters, Moving 3px to the Left, Blogs for Entrepreneurs, and Turning Browsers Into Active Shoppers.

Facebook Marketing

Top 5 Tips to increase fans on Facebook Fan Page
Basics for dummies! Continue reading Top 25 Internet Roundup: Tips to Increase Facebook Fans, Avoid Hashtag Disasters, Moving 3px to the Left, Blogs for Entrepreneurs, and Turning Browsers Into Active Shoppers.

How To Stand Out in a Sea of Web Content

The Great Wave by Aurore Colson

You’ve heard it said that content is king but with the 30 billion shares per month on Facebook, 200 million tweets per day on twitter and more than 48 hours of video posted to you tube each minute. How will your content for your business actually get noticed in that massive deluge of information?

The Answer: Passion

The beauty of the web for users is the ability to find exactly what we want when we want it. And most importantly to stay connected to subjects we are passionate about. People are passionate about sports, about decorating, about cooking, about wine, about celebrity gossip, about humanitarian efforts in Japan. As marketers it is our job to find topics of passion around which business owners and customers will connect in a meaningful way.

People Don’t Care About Things. They Care About Experiences with Things.

That is what our blogs, our videos, and our social shares have to center on if we want them to be meaningful. Engage readers, viewers, friends and tweeps in experiences, conversations, and topics they care about and make the things we sell a part of that larger experience.

Sell hotdogs? Instead of blogging about hotdogs try blogging about baseball (according to the national hot dog and sausage council major league ballparks were predicted to serve almost 22 million hotdogs per season! ). Discuss the fine points of the difference between a Dodger dog, a Chicago dog or a hot dog at Fenway or Yankee stadium.

Talk to Your Customers

People become passionate because of the experiences they have had. Find real stories that connect customers to you and to each other and build communication around the topics of those stories. Being the connection point between customers with shared passion will make your brand part of the glue in their relationships with each other.

A Motorcycle event promoter redesigned all their promotional content for a Memorial Day motorcycle show around honoring fallen U.S. troops. Fans responded with social shares, comments, and huge event response because they wanted to honor those they were close to. Sure they were Bikers and they wanted to go to a bike show, but the social traction gained by connecting to that larger issue massively improved the pre and post-show sharing. Following the event the tagline “Because They Died We Still Ride” continued to circulate the web.

What Passion Points Can You Tap into with Your Customers?

What passion points are consistent between your leadership, staff, and customers? Leverage some of those things as the center of your Facebook content.

The Cocktail Party Perspective: a simple analogy to help you be a courteous and effective social media marketer

Social Networks Are Like a Giant Cocktail Party
Social networks can be best described as a 24/7 global cocktail party. You can meet and engage people with no restrictions on time or geography and share insights, opportunities, and information to build deep relationships.

Your customers are posting genuine information about their likes, dislikes, and personal preferences, demographics, location and more. You can cross reference this data and gain customer insight without the expense or headache of focus groups or surveys.

The key is to remember this is not a commercial forum. The job of the social network is not for you to spam your prospects and customers with marketing messages. Your goal is to choose the right network or networks and provide valuable communication that leads to mutual benefit between you and your network.

The network also allows new prospective customers to see background on you based on who you are already connected to and find unbiased commentary on your business. (which exists online weather you are leveraging it or not). You should at minimum use social networks to be aware of your customer’s views of your brand.

If you view your social media use from this perspective you should generate value for both yourself and your friends, fans, customers, contacts, connections, supports and anyone else on your social media radar.